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The Temple Mount Sifting Project was created in order to save as many ancient artifacts as possible from thousands of tons of this debris and to conduct archaeological research on the finds in order to cast more light on the history of the Temple Mount: a place of significance to billions of people throughout the world. Anything that happens on the Temple Mount resonates throughout the world Jerusalem is the most excavated city in the world, but no systematic archaeological excavation has ever taken place on the Temple Mount The Sifting Project is as close as anyone has ever come to excavating the Temple Mount itself. Our Finds Casting New Light on this Universally Significant and Hallowed Site Over 200,000 volunteers from all facets of society, both Israelis and foreigners, have taken part in sifting earth from the Temple Mount. This tedious task could not have been done without the help of a large number of people. This phenomenon of such a large number of participants has no precedent in the history of archaeological research. For your servants have cherished her stones, and have redeemed her dust (psalms 102: 14-15) The Dirt of the Temple Mount is in Your Hands. Join the Sifting.

The Sifting Project in Numbers

15

years of sifting

3520

out of 4,752 tons of dirt sifted so far.

204500

people participated in the sifting

500000

uncovered artifacts waiting to be published in archaeological reports

Recent News

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Special Update Following the Coronavirus Pandemic Crisis

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic reaching Israel in early March and leading to the Israeli border closure as well as government orders calling for social distancing, the new sifting site experienced amazing progress. We received many bookings…
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KI10 Here We Come!

When we transported the piles of Temple Mount soil debris from their initial dumping sites, we hypothesized that the piles were not evenly and completely mixed, but rather were distributed like a lightly tossed salad, such that different…

Find & Finder of the Month: A Bulla of an Unknown Type, Discovered by the Schwartzes

This month we present you with Miriam and Elie Schwartz, of Philadelphia, PA, who found a small pottery shard, which may look unimportant at first glance (even to some of our seasoned archaeologists). However, on careful examination, some interesting…

The History of the Temple Mount in 12 Objects

Find of the Month

Team Spotlight

Temple Mount News

Video Tour to the Temple Mount

Videos from the Temple Mount Sifting Project