Portfolio Items

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Iron Roman Tanged Trilobate Arrowhead (1st Cent. CE)

An iron trefoil arrowhead of the Early Roman period. This arrowhead may be related to battles of the Great Revolt against the Roman that lead to the the destruction of the Second Temple (66-70 CE). Such arrowheads were found in Gamla and Masada, which were major strongholds during the great revolt.
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Various Bullets of Modern Weapons

Hundreds of bullets, slugs, and casings representing a wide range of firearms have come up through the sifting process. These modern projectiles range from the lead musket-balls of the Ottoman Period (top left) to bullets used by the IDF. to this very day. 9mm rounds were used in Uzzi sub-machine guns, which were fired within he Temple Mount during the Six Day War of 1967. Two .50 caliber projectiles may be traceable to a particular battle, where on the morning of June 6th, 1967, a group of IDF tanks after taking a wrong turn came under fire from a Jordanian outpost located atop the Golden Gate, and returned fire with their Browning M2 machine gun mounted on the tank’s turret.
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Iron Armor Piercing Crusader Crossbow Bolt (11th – 12th Cent. CE)

An iron “armor piercing” arrowhead of the Crusader Period (11th-12th Century CE). This arrowhead, considerably heavier than those of earlier periods, was likely fired from a crossbow.
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Lead Hellenistic Period Sling Stone (2nd Cent. BCE)

A lead sling-stone of the Hellenistic Period. Note the lightning-bolts, the symbol of Zeus.
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Bronze Hellenistic Period Arrowhead (2nd Cent. BCE)

A bronze arrowhead of the Hellenistic Period, probably 2nd century BCE. The double-hook design, along with arrowhead socket, made for difficult removal from the target’s body. This arrowhead may be related to one of several battles of the Hasmonaeans on and near the Temple Mount.
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Bronze Babylonian Arrowhead (6th Cent. BCE)

A bronze trefoil Scytho-Iranian arrowhead, 6th century BCE, end of the First Temple Period. Arrows such as these were used by the army of Nebuchadnezzar who destroyed the First Temple in 586 BCE. The aerodynamic arrowhead was designed for maximum damage — the solid triangular point leading into the arrow’s target was followed by three blades, inhibiting wound closure and increasing blood-loss. Rather than a tang that would fit snugly into the arrow-shaft, the arrowhead was fitted with a socket, giving an increased chance of it breaking off and remaining in the victim’s body.
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Bronze Arrowhead of the First Temple Period (10th Cent. BCE)

A bronze leaf-shaped (lanceolate) arrowhead (6.6 cm long), dated to the 10th century BCE, the early First Temple Period. This arrowhead may have come from the Temple area, or from the administrative center of the time, also located within the confines of the modern-day Temple Mount enclosure. Arrowheads from this period are rarely found in Israel, and this one may attest to the existence of an armed force on the Temple Mount during this period.