Posts

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Find of the Month: Ancient Key Opens the Door to Mystery - Pastor Joe Putting

Along with the resumption of the sifting we decided also to revive our Find of the Month posts, fondly remembered from our years of sifting at the Tzurim Valley. This month we are excited to announce the discovery of a fragment of an ancient…
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The History of the Temple Mount in 12 Objects: #2 The Early First Temple Period

Ladies and gentlemen, step right up and meet this month’s guest – the earliest piece of weaponry ever to be recovered from the Temple Mount: The arrowhead is made of bronze, in a flat, lanceolate shape, while the tang (the bit that…
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Find of the Month: How Much Does it Weight? - Nicolle Perez

Possible First Temple scale weight found on Temple Mount
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TMSP Terracotta Figurines in the Ira and Ingeborg Rennert Conference of New Studies of Jerusalem

TMSP figurine assemblage may be related to a Judahite rejection of outside influences during the Iron Age II, which found it greatest manifestation in the cultic and national center on the Temple Mount.
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Making Seal Impressions

How we made the seal impressions from our 10th century BCE stamp seal
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Find of the Month: Figurine Fragment - Or & Naya Korshaya

Two sisters found the leg of an Iron Age figurine at the Temple Mount Sifting Project.
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Aaron Greener: It Figures: TMSP Staff are Experts in their Field

Aaron Greener has been part of the Temple Mount Sifting Project (TMSP) staff since the project's inception. He has held various positions over the years, but you may remember him as site archaeologist and guide, or fantastic lecturer.

Portfolio Items

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First Temple Period (Iron Age; 10th Cent. BCE - 586 BCE)

About 5% of the entire ceramic sample obtained by the project dates to the First Temple Period (ca. 950-586 BCE). This assemblage is comprised of locally produced vessels made of Terea rossa clay common in Jerusalem and its vicinity and is dominated by wheel-burnished tableware characteristic of the period. As with other Judahite assemblages of the period, the Temple Mount assemblage is restricted to relatively few types, reflecting a standardization of forms suitable for mass production. When compared to other First Temple Period assemblages from Jerusalem, the Temple Mount assemblage is characterized by relatively large numbers of storage jars, jugs, juglets, chalices and stands and comparatively few bowls and oil lamps. Other than common vessels for daily use found in abundance, vessels such as pilgrim flasks, rattles and cultic objects, including chalices, cultic stands, incense burners and other unique vessels were found as well.